Cramer’s “Catenae in Evangelia S. Matthaei et S. Marci” online

I have accidentally found this volume online at Google books from a search on “cramer catena”.  It is here.  I could wish that I had known this before seeking out physical copies and paying for photocopies.  The authors used in the catena are listed at the back, with page references.  It contains a number of passages from the “Quaestiones ad Marinum”.

The other catenae published by John Cramer are listed at Google books, but with no content.  Let’s hope that they come online too.

PS: I have just found the catena on 1 Corinthians online too here.  Also his Anecdota Graeca from various manuscript collections.  As ever, a list of authors quoted and page numbers is at the back.

3 Responses to “Cramer’s “Catenae in Evangelia S. Matthaei et S. Marci” online”


  1. Laura Gibbs

    Google Books is an amazing resource for old books – I’ve found an incredible variety of 18th and 19th-century editions of Aesop’s fables there, both Greek and Latin. Recently, Google has made it possible for you to create and share a library online, using tags to organize the books, search, etc. I have some notes about that here – using the MyLibrary option is easier than cutting-and-pasting the enormous URLs for individual books! :-)

    Google Books and “My Library”

    In case that link does not work, here it is a different way:
    http://tinyurl.com/3kjaze

  2. Roger Pearse

    Very interesting indeed. I must look at this.

    I drove over to Oxford one Saturday, in order to take a look at a couple of books. One of these was the Luke/John part of Cramer. But I found that the Bodleian wanted to charge me double for photocopies if I wanted them posted to me. In the end I gave up! So I am very aware of the benefits of Google books at the moment, out of frustration with paper libraries! And it keeps on coming. Surely one of the great initiatives of our time.

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