From my diary

The first complete draft of Severian of Gabala, De Spiritu Sancto, has arrived.  More to the point, I have now read through it all and given feedback.  One section of it is distinctly hard to follow in the original, because Severian is not being as clear as he might be.  In consequence he has to keep asking his audience to concentrate!

But it’s an interesting sermon.  Once we’ve added enough words in brackets so that the reader can follow the thought, I think that it will be of general interest to modern readers who would like to understand the basis from scripture for some of the church’s statements about the Holy Spirit.

I’ve continued working on the Mithras site.  This week I located pictures of two lost reliefs, and added them to the index of monuments.  It is a very great privilege to live in the internet age, when we can locate relatively easily materials that would have been quite impossible to access, back in 1997, when I started Tertullian.org!

I’ve also had an update on a Greek homily that I commissioned; work is in progress.  There is also hope of a translation of the Syriac remains of Theodore of Mopsuestia on Genesis.

Autumn has now definitely arrived here, and this leads me to think of Christmas, and so of Santa Claus.  It seems to be a fact that the hagiographical Lives of St. Nicholas have never been translated into English, or indeed any modern language.  Unfortunately they are late, and exist in multiple versions.  It might be fun to select one or two and commission translations, tho.  Mightn’t it?!

3 thoughts on “From my diary

  1. “He has to keep asking his audience to concentrate”. In fact, he often does ! But remember that the audience was sometimes talking during the sermon… and Severian’s exegesis is not always simple.

  2. I second the motion for a life of St. Nick!

    also ran across this:

    “the outstanding chapter by Manfred Clauss, 242-262, concerning Mithras.”

    Lisbeth Bredholt Christensen, Olav Hammer, David A. Warburton (ed.), The Handbook of Religions in Ancient Europe. European history of religions.

    http://bmcr.brynmawr.edu/2014/2014-09-19.html

Leave a Reply